CONVENTION ON THE PROHIBITION OF THE USE, STOCKPILING, PRODUCTION AND TRANSFER OF
ANTI-PERSONNEL MINES AND ON THEIR DESTRUCTION

Reporting Formats for Article 7


STATE [Party/Signatory]: Sweden
Date of Submission: 30 April 2003


STATE Party:Sweden
Date of Submission2003-04-30
Point of ContactMs Sara Uddenberg, Ministry for Foreign Affairs, Department for Global Security,
tel: +46/8/405 5734, fax +46/8/723 11 76,
e-mail: sara.uddenberg@foreign.ministry.se
(Organization, telephones, fax, email)
(ONLY FOR THE PURPOSES OF CLARIFICATION)



Article 7.1 "Each State Party shall report to the Secretary-General ... on:
a) The national implementation measures referred to in Article 9."

Remark: In accordance with Article 9, "Each State Party shall take all appropriate legal, administrative and other measures, including the imposition of penal sanctions, to prevent and suppress any activity prohibited to a State Party under this Convention undertaken by persons or on territory under its jurisdiction or control".


State [Party]: Sweden reporting for time period from/for 1 January 2002 to 31 December 2002


Measures
    The Swedish Parliament decided already in September 1996 on a total ban on the use of anti-personnel mines by the Swedish Armed Forces. The decision also involved the destruction of all anti-personnel mines before the end of 2001.

    At the time of the Swedish accession to the Ottawa Convention, a number of new laws, all of which came into force on 1 May 1999, were adopted in Sweden.

    In order to secure compliance, the Convention has laid down a system of facilitation and clarification of compliance with gradually escalating measures, including the ultimate authorisation of a fact-finding mission which will gather information on site in the state in question (art. 8). Sweden therefore adopted a new act on inspections carried out under the Convention (SFS 1998:1705). The act contains the necessary rules for ensuring that a fact-finding mission can be fully carried out on Swedish territory, such as rules on admission to areas and facilities and assistance by the police. Such a fact-finding mission is ensured privileges and immunity by means of an amendment (SFS 1998:1704) to the Act (1976:661) on Immunity and Privileges in Certain Cases. In January 2000, the Swedish Government adopted a supplementary Ordinance of inspections, carried out under the Convention (SFS 2000:22). The Ordinance, which came into force on 1 March 2000, lays down a number of supplementary administrative rules, for instance defining the competent national authorities.

    Under the Ottawa Convention, the State Parties undertake to take all appropriate legal and other measures, including the imposition of penal sanctions, to prevent and suppress activities prohibited under the Convention. Since the Convention provides for a total ban on anti-personnel mines, Sweden introduced a new criminal offence in the Penal code, Ch. 22 sec. 6 b (SFS 1998:1703), Unlawful Dealings with Mines. The provision defines all activities prohibited under the Convention as a criminal act, unless the act is not considered a crime under international law. The offence can be punished by up to four years of imprisonment or, if the crime is gross, ten years or life imprisonment.



    Article 7. 1 "Each State Party shall report to the Secretary-General ... on:
    b) The total of all stockpiled anti-personnel mines owned or possessed by it, or under its jurisdiction or control, to include a breakdown of the type, quantity and, if possible, lot numbers of each type of anti-personnel mine stockpiled."


    State [Party]: Sweden reporting for time period from/for 1 January 2002 to 31 December 2002


    In December 2001 Sweden completed the destruction of stockpiles of anti-personnel mines. For figures on anti-personnel mines kept in accordance with article 3 see form D. All other devices of claymore type have been reconstructed and rendered useless as anti-personnel mined. For details see article 7 report 2002.



    Article 7.1 "Each State Party shall report to the Secretary-General ... on:
    c) To the extent possible, the location of all mined areas that contain, or are suspected to contain, anti-personnel mines under its jurisdiction or control, to include as much detail as possible regarding the type and quantity of each type of anti-personnel mine in each mined area and when they were emplaced."


    State [Party]: Sweden reporting for time period from/for 1 January 2002 to 31 December 2002




    1. Areas that contain mines

    There are no mined areas in Sweden

    2. Areas suspected to contain mines

    There are no areas suspected of being mined in Sweden



    Article 7.1 "Each State Party shall report to the Secretary-General ... on:
    d) The types, quantities and, if possible, lot numbers of all anti-personnel mines retained or transferred for the development of and training in mine detection, mine clearance or mine destruction techniques, or transferred for the purpose of destruction, as well as the institutions authorized by a State Party to retain or transfer anti-personnel mines, in accordance with Article 3"


    State [Party]: Sweden reporting for time period from/for 1 January 2002 to 31 December 2002




    1. Retained for development of and training in (Article 3, para.1)


    TypeQuantityLot # (if possible)Supplementary information
    Truppmina 102 443M4731-320101In 2002 225 mines have been used for training of personnel and dogs. 32 mines have been used for development of mine clearance technique.
    Trampmina 49 B 3 435 Complete mines (charge + fuse) +

    2 782 Mines without fuses, which could be connected to fuses kept for dummies.

    M4731-310022 In 2002 555 mines have been used for training of personnel and dogs. 58 mines have been used for development of mine clearance technique. Furthermore 3200 fuses have been used in dummies for development of mine clearance technique.
    Truppmina 10 Mines kept by Bofors Defence, Saab Bofors Test Center, to be used for development of mine clearance equipment. 4 869M4731-320101Complete mines (charge+fuse) are kept for use in development of mine clearance equipment.
    Trampmina 49 B Mines kept by Bofors Defence, Saab Bofors Test Center, to be used for development of mine clearance equipment.2 200M4731-310022Complete mines (charge+fuse) are kept for use in development of mine clearance equipment.
    PROM 1* 6In 2002 4 mines have been used for development of mine clearance technique.
    PMA 1* 43In 2002 45 mines have been used for training of personnel and dogs.
    PMA 2 *50In 2002 50 mines have been used for training of personnel and dogs.
    PMR 2A*96
    PMA 3*6In 2002 33 mines have been used for training of personnel and dogs.
    MRUD*85
    TOTAL16 015
    * These mines are foreign anti-personnel mines.

    In the Swedish article 7 report 2002 it was reported that the Swedish Armed Forces had calculated the annual amount of mines necessary for training to 733 and the amount necessary for testing and development of mine clearance equipment during 10 years to
    2 200. During 2002 the Armed Forces used a total of 1002 mines for these purposes; 908 mines for training purposes and 94 mines for development of mine clearance equipment.

    The amount of mines retained by Bofors Defence, Saab Bofors Test Center, (as of 11 March 2003) is 7 069 (4869+2200) , which means that the actual amount retained is higher than reported last year (4000). These mines are to be used for development of mine clearance equipment by Bofors Defence or destroyed in the next couple of years. During 2003 it will be further examined how the amount of mines should be reduced.

    2. Transferred for development of and training in (Article 3, para.1)

    No mines have left Sweden for these purposes.

    3. Transferred for the purpose of destruction (Article 3, para.2)




    Article 7.1 "Each State Party shall report to the Secretary-General ... on:
    e) The status of programs for the conversion or de-commissioning of anti-personnel mine production facilities."


    State [Party]: Sweden reporting for time period from/for 1 January 2002 to 31 December 2002


    Since Sweden has not procured any anti-personnel mines for a long time and the Swedish industrial sector has not exported any, there are no facilities for this purpose.



    Article 7.1 "Each State Party shall report to the Secretary-General ... on:
    f) The status of programs for the destruction of anti-personnel mines in accordance with Articles 4 and 5, including details of the methods which will be used in destruction, the location of all destruction sites and the applicable safety and environmental standards to be observed."


    State [Party]: Sweden reporting for time period from/for 1 January 2002 to 31 December 2002




    1. Status of programs for destruction of stockpiled APMs (Article 4)

    The program was finished in December 2001 when the destruction of the stockpiles was finalised. For details see the article 7 report 2002.

    2. Status of programs for destruction of APMs in mined areas (Article 5)

    Sweden has no mined areas, see Form C.



    Article 7.1 "Each State Party shall report to the Secretary-General ... on:
    g) The types and quantities of all anti-personnel mines destroyed after the entry into force of this Convention for that State Party, to include a breakdown of the quantity of each type of anti-personnel mine destroyed, in accordance with Articles 4 and 5, respectively, along with, if possible, the lot numbers of each type anti-personnel mine in the case of destruction in accordance with Article 4"


    State [Party]: Sweden reporting for time period from/for 1 January 2002 to 31 December 2002




    1. Destruction of stockpiled APMs (Article 4)

    Sweden finalised the destruction of stockpiled anti-personnel mines in December 2001. See the article 7 report 2002.

    2. Destruction of APMs in mined areas (Article 5)

    Sweden has no mined areas, see Form C



    Article 7.1 "Each State Party shall report to the Secretary-General ... on:
    h) The technical characteristics of each type of anti-personnel mine produced, to the extent known, and those currently owned or possessed by a State Party, giving, where reasonably possible, such categories of information as may facilitate identification and clearance of anti-personnel mines; at a minimum, this information shall include the dimensions, fusing, explosive content, metallic content, colour photographs and other information which may facilitate mine clearance"


    State [Party]: Sweden reporting for time period from/for 1 January 2002 to 31 December 2002




    1. Technical characteristics of each APM-type produced


    TypeDimensionsFusing
    Explosive content
    Metallic

    content

    grams

    Colour photo attachedSupplementary information to facilitate mine clearance.
    typegrams
    Truppmina 9L 188 D 37Pressure/trip wirePlastic expl125600-
    Truppmina 10H 30 D 80PressureTNT1200.14-
    Truppmina 11H 190 D 100Trip wireTNT5003,000-
    Trampmina 41L200W80H50 PressureTNT15050-
    Trampmina 49 B Anti-personnel mine 49 A had an equivalent ignitor which was eliminated a long time ago.H 55 D 75PressureTNT18012-
    Betongmina 43 TH230D110Trip wireTNT800100-
    Splittermina 48H 180 D 90Trip wireTNT5002,000-
    Granatmina 43 8cmH 220 D 80Trip wireNitrolite4002,000-
    Granatmina 43 T 8 cmH 220 D 80Trip wireTNT5501,950-
    Granatmina 43 T 10cmH 400 D 100Trip wireTNT1,5009,000-


    2. Technical characteristics of each APM-type currently owned or possessed

    See table H 1.



    Article 7.1 "Each State Party shall report to the Secretary-General ... on:
    i) The measures taken to provide an immediate and effective warning to the population in relation to all areas identified under paragraph 2 of Article 5."

    Remark: In accordance with Article 5, para.2: "Each State Party shall make every effort to identify all areas under its jurisdiction or control in which anti-personnel mines are known or suspected to be emplaced and shall ensure as soon as possible that all anti-personnel mines in mined areas under its jurisdiction or control are perimeter-marked, monitored and protected by fencing or other means, to ensure the effective exclusion of civilians, until all anti-personnel mines contained therein have been destroyed. The marking shall at least be to the standards set out in the Protocol on Prohibitions or Restrictions on the Use of Mines, Booby-Traps and Other Devices, as amended on 3 May 1996, annexed to the Convention on Prohibitions or Restrictions on the Use of Certain Conventional Weapons Which May Be Deemed to Be Excessively Injurious or to Have Indiscriminate Effects".


    State [Party]: Sweden reporting for time period from/for 1 January 2002 to 31 December 2002


    No measures have been taken since there are no mined areas in Sweden, see Form C.

    Other relevant information is provided in Form J.



    Remark: States Parties may use this form to report voluntarily on other relevant matters, including matters pertaining to compliance and implementation not covered by the formal reporting requirements contained in Article 7. States Parties are encouraged to use this form to report on activities undertaken with respect to Article 6, and in particular to report on assistance provided for the care and rehabilitation, and social and economic reintegration, of mine victims.


    State [Party]: Sweden reporting for time period from/for 1 January 2002 to 31 December 2002


    STATE Party:Sweden
    Date of Submission2003-04-30
    Point of ContactMs Sara Uddenberg, Ministry for Foreign Affairs, Department for Global Security,
    tel: +46/8/405 5734, fax +46/8/723 11 76,
    e-mail: sara.uddenberg@foreign.ministry.se

    Section 1
    Care – includes programs, training, equipment, and transport for emergency medical care, continuing hospital care, amputation surgery, post-surgery medical care related to amputation or treatment of other landmine-related trauma.

    Activity, funding and/or in-kind contributionsImplementing organization or agency
    Sida gives general support to the International Red Cross annually (year 2003 with 230 Million Swedish Kronor). The support includes rehabilitation of mine victims and mine awareness but the ICRC is not obliged to report to Sida on project level why it is not possible to identify the exact figures for rehabilitation of mine victims and mine risk education. Other recipents of Swedish general support which supports mine victims are e.g. UNICEF of UNDP.

    In the Swedish bilateral aid programmes where there is a health component mine victims belong to the beneficiaries. Among those partners are mine affected countries like Mozambique, Angola, Cambodia, Boznia-Hercegovina. In these programmes mine victims are not being exclusively treated but are naturally targeted as a prioirty group.
    Section 2
    Rehabilitation – includes programs, training, equipment, and transport for physical rehabilitation such as physiotherapy, prosthetics and other assistance devices, and the training/education of personnel in these fields. May also include psychological interventions as attached to the medical system.

    Activity, funding and/or in-kind contributions
    See section 1
    Implementing organization or agency
    Section 3
    Social reintegration – includes psychological support to landmine survivors and/or their families, support to associations of people with disabilities, peer groups, peer counselling, support to sports programs for disabled participants and the training of relevant personnel such as social workers, therapists, and peer counsellors to provide these services. Also includes development of appropriate disability policy and practices.

    Activity, funding and/or in-kind contributions
    See section 1
    Implementing organization or agency
    Section 4
    Economic reintegration – includes skill and vocational training programs, income generation and small business programs.

    Activity, funding and/or in-kind contributionsImplementing organization or agency
    See section 1

    Section 5
    Other – such as data collection

    Activity, funding and/or in-kind contributionsImplementing organization or agency
    In 1997, Sweden established SWEDEC, a centre for humanitarian demining as well as military mine clearance. SWEDEC is the country's focal point on technical matters, training, etc.
      Sweden has a relatively large R&D programme. Sweden is currently evaluating mechanical mine clearance equipment, with the aim of leading efforts in Europe for standardisation of test methods for this kind of equipment. The work is being coordinated with GICHD.

      Sweden participates actively in ITEP (International Test and Evaluation Program for Humanitarian Demining) and in the standardisation work done in Europe and at GICHD.

      Sweden has since 1995 conducted 13 naval mine clearance operations within the territorial waters of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania.

      During the period covered by this report, Sweden has contributed at least 71 million Swedish Crowns (SEK) to mine action. Most of this, SEK 65 million, was channelled through the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida). Projects supported by Sweden were directed mainly towards demining and awareness-raising in Angola, Ethiopia and Eritrea, Mozambique, Sri Lanka, Afghanistan, Cambodia, Nicaragua, northern Iraq, Bosnia-Hercegovina and Kosovo. Included in the 71 million were also a SEK 3 million grant to the United Nations Mine Action Service, a SEK 3 million contribution to GICHD, and a SEK 165 000 grant toward the ICBL, Landmine Monitor Report project.

      Sweden supports the sponsorship programme within the Mine Ban Treaty.