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HUMAN RIGHTS COUNCIL ADOPTS UNIVERSAL PERIODIC REVIEW OUTCOMES OF GABON, GHANA AND PERU

15 March 2018

The Human Rights Council in its midday meeting adopted the Universal Periodic Review outcomes of Gabon, Ghana and Peru.

Edgard Anicet Mboumbou Miyakou, State Minister of Justice of Gabon, said following the report presented by the Troika, the Government had accepted 14 additional recommendations.  Thus, from a total of 166 recommendations, Gabon had accepted 144.  Gabon was party to most international human rights instruments, and the ratification of others was underway.  A number of important steps had been taken for the further promotion of human rights, in particular the adoption of a new Constitution, the establishment of a higher Specialized Court of Justice, and the increase of women occupying important positions.

In the ensuing discussion, speakers affirmed that Gabon was making positive efforts to improve the human rights situation and the review of the national commission on human rights was a clear sign of progress.  Efforts to amend the criminal and civil codes to better address cases of domestic violence and empower women were welcomed as well as work in combatting poverty and introducing health payments to low-income families by the national health insurance and social protection fund.  Gabon was further commended for introducing legislation concerning sustainable development and urged to adopt a code on the protection of children.

Speaking were Cuba, Egypt, Ethiopia, Ghana, Honduras, Kenya, Libya, Madagascar, Pakistan, Philippines, Senegal and Morocco.

Also taking the floor were the following non-governmental organizations: International Volunteerism Organization for Women, Education and Development VIDES (in a joint statement with Istituto Internazionale Maria Ausiliatrice delle Salesiane di Don Bosco), Organisation pour la Communication en Afrique et de Promotion de la Coopération Économique Internationale OCAPROCE Internationale, United Nations Watch, Africa Culture Internationale, Rencontre Africaine pour la defense des droits de l’homme and International-Lawyers.Org.

The Vice President of the Council said that of 166 recommendations proposed, 144 were supported, and 22 were noted by Gabon.  The Council then adopted the Universal Periodic Review outcome of Gabon.

Ramses Joseph Cleland, Permanent Representative of Ghana to the United Nations Office at Geneva, informed the Council that a total of 200 recommendations out of 241 which had been made during the interactive dialogue had enjoyed the support of the delegation.  Those recommendations, together with the remaining 41 noted during the review, had been adopted by the Universal Periodic Review Working Group.   After careful consultations on the 41 noted, a further 12 had been accepted. 

In the ensuing discussion, speakers commended Ghana for accepting 200 recommendations out of 241, and noted many achievements, including ratification of the Second Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights aiming at the abolition of the death penalty, ensuring universal access to sexual and reproductive health, social initiatives that contributed to alleviating poverty, and free education for children of all ages. Ghana was encouraged to accelerate efforts to end child marriage, address HIV stigmatization, tackle youth unemployment, adopt sexual and reproductive policy for adolescents and to further combat violence and discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity.

Speaking were Ethiopia, Gabon, Honduras, Kenya, Lesotho, Libya, Madagascar, Pakistan, Philippines, Senegal, Sierra Leone, South Africa and Sudan.

Also taking the floor were the following non-governmental organizations: Defence for Children International, Edmund Rice International Limited, Federatie van Nederlandse Vereniging tot Integratie van Homoseksualiteit (in a joint statement with International Lesbian and Gay Association), Swedish Association for Sexuality Education, Action Canada for Population and Development, Human Rights Watch, Rencontre Africaine pour la defense des droits de l’homme, International Humanist and Ethical Union.

The Vice-President of the Human Rights Council informed that out of 241 recommendations received, Ghana had supported 212, partially accepted two recommendations, and noted 27.  The Council then adopted the Universal Periodic Review outcome of Ghana.

Claudio Julio De la Puente Ribeyro, Permanent Representative of Peru to the United Nations Office at Geneva, said that the Government of Peru had decided to accept 177 out of 182 recommendations.  The received recommendations covered various aspects, including the ratification of diverse international conventions on civil and political rights, as well as economic, social and cultural rights, women’s rights, rights of persons with disabilities, vulnerable populations, human rights defenders, indigenous peoples, people of African descent, sexual and reproductive health rights, trafficking in persons, and business and human rights. 

In the ensuing discussion, speakers congratulated Peru on combatting discrimination and on its third National Plan for Human Rights 2018-2021, which was a comprehensive tool ensuring the realization of human rights across different areas, including lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex rights.  Progress achieved towards the realization of children’s rights in Peru was welcomed, including the adoption of legislation concerning the protection of children without parental care, prohibiting corporal punishment and on adolescent criminal justice.  However, protection services for children had to be strengthened and the rights of indigenous people, especially children, further protected.  Several speakers regretted that the President had granted a pardon to former President Alberto Fujimori who had been sentenced to 25 years for crimes against humanity, saying such an act had profound consequences for the right of truth.

Speaking were the United Nations Children’s Fund, Algeria, Brazil, Chile, China, Egypt, Haiti, Honduras, Sierra Leone, Philippines, and the United Nations Population Fund.

Also taking the floor were the following non-governmental organizations: Centre for Reproductive Rights, Inc, Edmund Rice International Limited, International Commission of Jurists, International Service for Human Rights (in a joint statement with National Coordinator for Human Rights), Istituto Internazionale Maria Ausiliatrice delle Salesiane di Don Bosco (in a joint statement with Caritas Internationalis International Confederation of Catholic Charities and International Volunteerism Organization for Women, Education and Development – VIDES), Amnesty International, Centro de Promocion y Defensa de los Derechos Sexuales y Reproductivos, and National Coordinator for Human Rights.

The Vice-President of the Human Rights Council informed that out of 182 recommendations received, Peru had supported 177 and noted 5.  The Council then adopted the Universal Periodic Review outcome of Peru.


The Council will next consider the Universal Periodic Review outcomes of Guatemala, Switzerland and the Republic of Korea.


Consideration of the Outcome of the Universal Periodic Review of Gabon

EDGARD ANICET MBOUMBOU MIYAKOU, State Minister of Justice of Gabon, said Gabon had undertaken a dialogue with all the States that had taken part in the debate.  Following the report presented by the Troika, the Government had accepted an additional 14 recommendations.  Thus, from a total of 166 recommendations, Gabon had accepted 144.  Gabon was party to most international human rights instruments, and the ratification of others was underway.  As part of the implementation of the inclusive debate policy, a number of important steps had been taken, in particular the adoption of a new Constitution, the establishment of a higher Specialized Court of Justice, the increase of women occupying important positions, the adoption of a two-round election system, and an amendment to the election rules for the Constitutional Court judges who would be elected for nine year non-renewable mandates.  Draft orders had also been adopted to increase the number of Members of Parliament, and the number of Representatives in the provincial, departmental and communal assemblies.  The law on the election of the President of the Republic would also be amended. 

The most recent meeting in Libreville of the Economic and Social Council sought to provide economic and long-term stability and order.  In order to prevent torture, a roadmap for a national mechanism had been implemented, following a meeting with the Subcommittee on the Prevention of Torture, and would be tabled for adoption in Parliament in the next few months.  Laws organizing the judiciary, the criminal code, and the rights of the child would be addressed together with other stakeholders, with particular regard to the fight against trafficking of children.  Finally, a Draft Order on the freedom of expression had been adopted on the organization and functioning of the Higher Communication Authority.  The report demonstrated Gabon’s commitment to improving the human rights situation in the country.  Mr. Miyakou vowed that his country would continue to support all initiatives to bolster these efforts.

Cuba recognized that Gabon was striving to comply with recommendations of the previous Universal Periodic Review cycle.  Cuba urged Gabon to strengthen all action to protect children, including through the adoption of a code on the protection of children.

Egypt said it was aware that Gabon was making positive efforts to improve the human rights situation in the country.  The review of the national commission on human rights was a clear sign of progress.  Training was also being provided to law enforcement personnel.  Egypt welcomed the acceptance of its recommendation on matters of trafficking in persons.

Ethiopia noted Gabon’s constructive engagement with the Human Rights Council and efforts to put in place a national mechanism for the prevention of torture and to enhance the role of women in society.

Ghana commended Gabon’s efforts to amend its criminal and civil codes to better address cases of domestic violence.  Ghana endorsed the adoption of the Universal Periodic Review outcome by consensus and wished Gabon success in implementing the recommendations.

Honduras welcomed the constructive spirit and the transparency in which Gabon had received the recommendations.  Gabon was further commended for combatting discrimination and ensuring equal opportunities in the country.  Legislation was introduced in line with the Sustainable Development Goals, and improvement was noted concerning forced marriage.  Gabon was wished successful implementation of the recommendations.

Kenya thanked to the Government of Gabon for providing further information on the implementation of human rights in the country.  Gabon had accepted many recommendations during the last review, demonstrating its long-standing commitment to human rights.  Gabon was commended for work it had undertaken in combatting poverty, considering that the national health insurance and social protection fund covered the costs of health, water and electricity and paid benefits to low-income families.

Libya commended that Gabon had accepted a large number of recommendations of the Universal Periodic Review and the Council was called on to adopt the report.  Gabon was wished successful implementation of the recommendations.

Madagascar welcomed the country’s willingness to accept a large number of recommendations and its commitment to combatting school dropout rates as well as fighting against poverty.  Amendments of the Civil Code when it came to women’s empowerment were noted and Gabon was wished every success with the implementation of recommendations.

Pakistan welcomed the delegation of Gabon and thanked it for presenting the update on the accepted recommendations.  It commended the Government for accepting the majority of the recommendations which had been made during the Universal Periodic Review Working Group session, and wished the country every success in the implementation of the accepted recommendations.

Philippines congratulated the Government of Gabon for supporting a number of the recommendations it had received during the interactive dialogue, and appreciated the country’s commitment to continue working on the promotion and protection of human rights, in particular the rights of children.

Senegal thanked Gabon for accepting the majority of the recommendations, including those that had been proposed by Senegal.  This spoke volumes of the Government’s commitment to promote and protect human rights in the country.  Senegal invited Council to adopt the report.

Morocco commended Gabon for its constructive commitment with the Universal Periodic Review mechanism.  This commitment was evidenced in the acceptance of the 144 recommendations.  A number of institutional measures had been undertaken to implement the second cycle measures.  Morocco welcomed the code for childhood and the standing national coordinative body, as well as the efforts to combat torture and the ratification of Convention against Torture.  It recommended the adoption of the report.

International Volunteerism Organization for Women, Education and Development VIDES, in a joint statement with Istituto Internazionale Maria Ausiliatrice delle Salesiane di Don Bosco), speaking in a joint statement, welcomed Gabon’s approach to the Universal Periodic Review cycle in terms of engaging with civil society.  However, more must be done to ensure the protection of children and their access to education.  The high cost of education remained a major impediment for many children.  Education must be free and of high quality.

Organisation pour la Communication en Afrique et de Promotion de la Coopération Économique Internationale OCAPROCE Internationale welcomed the creation of legal assistance offices for women and encouraged efforts to increase women’s representation in public life.  The organization congratulated Gabon on the establishment of a national health development plan.

United Nations Watch was deeply concerned about the precarious situation of human rights in Gabon.  The country had seen a sharp decline in political rights and examples of abuses abounded.  Dissidents were facing harsh conditions in overcrowded prisons.  The Government was suppressing political opposition and seeking to place power solely in the hands of the President.  Gabon must proceed with free and fair elections this year.

Africa Culture International welcomed efforts in Gabon to develop its medical infrastructure.  The group encouraged Gabon to continue cooperating with United Nations entities in promoting the human rights of vulnerable girls.

Rencontre Africaine pour la defense des droits de l’homme noted the efforts that Gabon had undergone since the second periodic review, including new legislation and ratification of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court.  However, concern was raised over political arrests and disappearances of opposition sympathisers.  Authorities were encouraged to work to ensure that impartial investigations were conducted.  More effort was needed for combatting rape, corruption and ritual crimes.

International-Lawyers.Org commended efforts in improving freedom and independence of the press through the new Communications Code.  However, some provisions were problematic, like those prohibiting Gabonese nationals working for local media outlets outside of the country.  Additionally, there had been reports of journalists being arrested.  The Government was urged to ensure full exercise of the right to freedom of expression.

The Vice President said that of 166 recommendations proposed, 144 were supported, and 22 were noted.

EDGARD ANICET MBOUMBOU MIYAKOU, State Minister of Justice of Gabon, reiterated the efforts that the Government had been conducting in combatting poverty and discrimination.  Human rights were not being violated, there were no political prisoners, no journalists were in prison, just persons guilty of common crimes.  Concerning the demonstrations of 2017 no one had been found guilty.

The Council then adopted the outcome of the Universal Periodic Review of Gabon.

Consideration of the Outcome of the Universal Periodic Review of Ghana

RAMSES JOSEPH CLELAND, Permanent Representative of Ghana to the United Nations Office at Geneva, said the review had been held in November 2017.  The delegation had received, through the troika a list of questions prepared in advance by a number of countries.  Ghana appreciated the interactive dialogue, through which some 98 had made interventions.  A total of 200 recommendations out of 241 made during the interactive dialogue enjoyed the support of the delegation.  These recommendations, together with the remaining 41 noted during the review, had been adopted by the Universal Periodic Review Working Group.   After careful consultations on the 41 noted, a further 12 had been accepted.  Ghana accepted the first part of the recommendation 147.2 on the strengthening of the application of the discrimination complaint system that allowed protecting the rights of people because of their sexual orientation and gender identity.  The second part of this recommendation, which was on the education to prevent discrimination against these students, had been noted. 

Ghana appreciated the solidarity, encouragement and support from States.  Recommendations received had covered many areas, including children’s rights, rights of persons belonging to the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transsexual and intersex community, mental health, and harmful traditional practices.  It had also received recommendations on the Affirmative Action Bill.  In this direction, it had initiated a series of initiatives to push for the quick passage of the Affirmative Action Bill to further advance the course of women empowerment and gender equality.  A campaign “He-for-She” had been recently launched.  In addition, the Office of the Special Prosecutor established in 2017 to strengthen the fight against corruption had become functional earlier in March.  As part of the efforts to promote the full enjoyment of economic and social rights and eradicate poverty, this Office would investigate cases of corruption involving political and public officials and prosecute all found guilty.  Ghana looked forward to hearing interventions from representatives of non-governmental organizations present in the room today with an open mind.

Ethiopia commended Ghana for accepting 200 recommendations out of 241, including Ethiopia’s recommendation on intensifying the implementation of the initiative to end forced and child marriage and to eliminate child trafficking.  Ethiopia supported the adoption of the Universal Periodic Review outcome of Ghana

Gabon noted with satisfaction the ratification of the Second Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights aimed at the abolition of the death penalty, protection of human rights as well as measures to end corporal punishment. Ghana was encouraged to continue efforts at promotion of human rights.

Honduras also endorsed ratification of the Second Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights aiming at the abolition of the death penalty and ensuring universal access to sexual and reproductive health.  Regret was voiced that Ghana did not decriminalize consensual sex amongst persons of same gender.

Kenya said that Ghana had accepted an incredible number of recommendations, including some of Kenya’s recommendations, demonstrating long-standing commitment.  Ghana was commended for peaceful and inclusive elections of December 2016, which had served as an example for most of the African continent.

Lesotho took note of the vital legislative framework in Ghana and appreciated measures undertaken in promoting social initiatives that contributed to alleviating poverty.  It commended the Government for realizing free education for children of all ages and called on the international community to extend Ghana its support.  While wishing Ghana every success, it encouraged it to accelerate efforts to end child marriage, address HIV stigmatization, and tackle youth unemployment.

Libya commended the acceptance by Ghana of the majority of the recommendations and the determination shown in implementing them.  It fully appreciated the commitment of the Government and recommended the adoption of the Universal Periodic Review report, wishing the country further success and progress in promoting and protecting human rights.

Madagascar congratulated Ghana for the presentation of the final report and for the additional information provided during the meeting.  It also congratulated Ghana's acceptance of the majority of the recommendations and commended the action taken, in particular on a child protection policy with a view to ending all violence against children, including corporal punishment.  It urged Ghana to make the respect for human rights more effective, and wished the country every success in implementing the recommendations accepted.

Pakistan commended the Government of Ghana for accepting the majority of the recommendations, including those made by Pakistan.  It wished it every success in implementing the recommendations, and called on the Council to adopt the outcome.

Philippines appreciated Ghana’s constructive engagement in the Universal Periodic Review process and its commitment to continue working on the promotion and protection of the human rights of its people.  It called on all Member States to support the adoption of the Universal Periodic Review outcome of Ghana.

Senegal welcomed the decision of the Government of Ghana to accept 123 recommendations and to take measures to improve the situation of human rights and fundamental freedoms.  Senegal encouraged Ghana to pursue those efforts and it invited the Council to adopt the Universal Periodic Review outcome of Ghana.

Sierra Leone commended the recent strategies of Ghana to provide free compulsory universal basic education for all children, and to establish the Justice for Children Policy to protect children’s rights within the justice system.  It was also pleased that measures would be taken to establish clear guidelines and to prevent commercial and sexual exploitation of children.  It furthermore noted Ghana’s acceptance of recommendations to effectively address and combat child marriage.

South Africa appreciated Ghana’s acceptance of its recommendations on implementing the outcomes of the Constitutional Review, completion of a national human rights plan aligned to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, steps towards the abolition of the death penalty, and ensuring the passage of the Affirmative Action Bill.  South Africa encouraged Ghana to increase women’s participation in decision-making and politics, to counter stigmatization of people living with HIV/AIDS, and to prioritize social protection interventions to address poverty and vulnerability.

Sudan welcomed the efforts of the Government of Ghana to increase access to and improve quality of education, reduce poverty and promote overall socio-economic development.  It also noted with satisfaction that Ghana had accepted the majority of the recommendations received during the Universal Periodic Review process, including three recommendations submitted by Sudan.

Defence for Children International, in a joint statement, welcomed the commitment to enhance the protection of children’s rights and the Government was further encouraged to implement recommendations concerning the ratification of the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography, fully implement the Domestic Violence Act, and adopt a sexual and reproductive policy for adolescents with a focus on girls.

Edmund Rice International Limited said that Ghana’s free compulsory universal basic education had been extended to senior high school students.  However, it had to invest more in public schools to improve the standard of teaching.  The State had to regulate the tuition and supplementary feels charged by all schools and create equal opportunities for families from different socio-economic areas.  This would assist with measuring desirable outcomes of Sustainable Development Goal 4, concerning quality education.

Federatie van Nederlandse Vereniging tot Integratie van Homoseksualiteit , in a joint statement withInternational Lesbian and Gay Association) thanked the Council’s members for giving Ghana 18 recommendations to further combat violence and discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity.  However, the equal application of human rights and the well-being of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex persons was still of concern. 

Swedish Association for Sexuality Education, in a joint statement, recognised Ghana’s increasing commitments to political and legal measures toward achieving gender equality and protecting women.  Yet stigma and rigid attitudes on gender roles threatened the effective implementation of such commitments.  Ghana was called on to scale up the ongoing work for the adoption and implementation of the guidelines on comprehensive reproductive health education as part of the school curricula.

Action Canada for Population and Development said Ghana had made important strides in responding to particular forms of violence and discrimination against women and girls, including through passing laws that criminalized female genital mutilation and intimate partner violence and rape, and the establishment of mechanisms and specialized units tasked with responding to various forms of gender based violence.  However, slow and incomplete investigation of cases and high levels of corruption within the system and secondary victimization led to underreporting of gender based violence, a general climate of impunity, and a serious lack of redress for survivors of violence.

Human Rights Watch said Ghana had taken positive steps in the field of mental health by establishing the Mental Health Authority, training mental health professionals, conducting awareness-raising on mental health, engaging with prayer camp leaders to prevent abusive practices, and even releasing 16 people shackled in one prayer camp in 2017.  However, based on a visit in October 2017 and meetings with senior government officials, some of the Authority’s most important mandates were still not implemented. 

Rencontre Africaine pour la defense des droits de l’homme highlighted the progress made by Ghana regarding democratisation, saying that the country was a model in Africa.  Progress in forced marriage and gender based discrimination was noted.  It was concerned however about the ongoing female genital mutilation, and called on the Government to enhance its efforts to stop traditional practices in rural areas.  It encouraged Ghana to ensure education in all parts of the country.

International Humanist and Ethical Union said violence and discrimination based on sexual orientation were deeply rooted in Ghana.  It was deeply concerned about measures criminalising sexual conduct between persons of non-traditional gender identity.  Despite the progress, harmful traditional practices remained responsible for a large number of abuses.  This included women and girls being subjected to female genital mutilation and accused of witchcraft, as well as discrimination against persons with albinism. 

RAMSES JOSEPH CLELAND, Permanent Representative of Ghana to the United Nations Office at Geneva, thanked State representatives and representatives of civil society for their constructive comments and concerns.  Ghana remained committed to engaging all relevant stakeholders who were willing to assist with the implementation of recommendations contained in the report of Ghana’s Universal Periodic Review.  Mr. Cleland reminded that the Office of the Attorney General in November 2017 had completed a process of establishing and hosting an inter-agency Coordinating Committee on Human Rights as a dedicated National Mechanism for Implementation, Reporting and Follow-up of Universal Periodic Review Recommendations and Human Rights, which would be inaugurated by the Attorney General and the Minister for Justice by the end of March 2018.  The third cycle of the Universal Periodic Review had provided an opportunity to reassess progress made so far and to address concerns in the coming years.

The Vice-President of the Human Rights Council informed that out of 241 recommendations received, Ghana had supported 212, partially accepted two recommendations, and noted 27.

The Council then adopted the Universal Periodic Review outcome of Ghana.

Consideration of the Outcome of the Universal Periodic Review of Peru

CLAUDIO JULIO DE LA PUENTE RIBEYRO, Permanent Representative of Peru to the United Nations Office at Geneva, said that the Government of Peru had decided to accept 177 out of 182 received recommendations, following consultation with all relevant stakeholders.  The received recommendations covered various aspects: ratification of diverse international conventions, civil and political rights, as well as economic, social and cultural rights, women’s rights, rights of persons with disabilities, vulnerable populations, human rights defenders, indigenous peoples, people of African descent, sexual and reproductive health rights, trafficking in persons, and businesses and human rights.  On the selection of candidates to the United Nations treaty bodies, the Government followed strict procedures, whereas it viewed that the recommendation with respect to decriminalization of abortion was not in line with international standards.  Turning to the death penalty, even though it had not been abolished, the Government followed a de facto policy of non-application. 

On 1 February 2018, Peru had adopted its third National Plan on Human Rights 2018-2021, aimed at ensuring the implementation of public policies in line with human rights.  The plan contained cross-cutting policies to benefit citizens and to promote the culture of peace, as well as a new pillar of implementation of international standards on businesses and human rights.  Another pillar prioritized 13 groups that required special protection, such as people of African descent, girls, boys and adolescents, persons deprived of their liberty, victims of terrorism, women, and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex persons. 

United Nations Children’s Fund welcomed progress made towards the realization of children’s rights in Peru, including the adoption of legislation concerning the protection of children without parental care, prohibiting corporal and humiliating punishment, and on adolescent criminal justice.  However, there were concerns that child victims of violence did not receive adequate protection and the budget allocated to the protection of children was only 1 per cent of Peru’s total public spending on children.  Therefore, comprehensive and specialized protection services for children had to be strengthened and made available across the country and alternative family-based care had to be further developed to reduce the number of children in institutions. 

Algeria welcomed the important progress made by Peru in combatting discrimination and forced labour, protecting women against violence, and steps taken to ratify a number of international legal instruments on human rights.  Peru had accepted most of the recommendations, including one by Algeria on the protection of female workers.  The Council was recommended to adopt the report.

Brazil congratulated Peru on the successful Universal Periodic Review in its third cycle.  This constructive approach towards human rights was demonstrated during the dialogue and Peru was congratulated for designing a national institution for protection from torture and advances of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex rights.

Chile congratulated Peru for its third National Plan for Human Rights 2018-2021, which was a multi-sector comprehensive tool ensuring the realization of human rights across different areas, including lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex rights.  Peru was invited to ratify multilateral instruments

China commended Peru’s constructive engagement with the Universal Periodic Review.  It welcomed the fact that the Government of Peru had accepted China’s recommendations to continue to promote sustainable economic development, improve people’s standard of living, reduce poverty, promote education and reduce illiteracy, and combat violence against women.

Egypt welcomed Peru’s spirit of cooperation with the Human Rights Council, and efforts to promote and protect human rights, as well as efforts to improve cooperation with the United Nations treaty bodies.

Haiti thanked Peru for having taken account of three recommendations from Haiti, notably on Afro-Peruvians.  It took note of the launch of the third National Plan on Human Rights 2018-2021, which incorporated a good number of the recommendations received during the three cycles of the Universal Periodic Review. 

Honduras welcomed Peru’s commitment to transparency and constructive spirit during the Universal Periodic Review.  Honduras expressed hope that Peru would continue to develop programmes of education and prevent child labour. 

Sierra Leone noted the recent endorsement of the third National Plan for Human Rights 2018-2021 and the future implementation of the National Plan on Action on Business and Human Rights in 2019.  Though Peru received 182 recommendations during the twenty-seventh session of the Universal Periodic Review, recommendations of Sierra Leone had not been accepted, so Peru was urged to ensure asylum seekers’ access to health care services.

Philippines congratulated the Government for supporting the majority of recommendations, including those of the Philippines.  Peru was wished every success in the implementation of its recommendations.

United Nations Population Fund said that this year Peru would host the third conference on population development.  As for violence against women, a comprehensive response was needed from justice and social services.  The prevention of teen pregnancy, particularly those younger than 14, had to be strengthened, and monitoring of social development had to be improved. 

Center for Reproductive Rights reminded that in Peru the interruption of pregnancy was only legal to save the life of the woman or to avoid serious and permanent damage to her health, also known as “therapeutic abortion.”  The organization regretted current significant efforts at the national level to regress the current law and make “therapeutic abortion” unlawful again.  It urged Peru to fulfil its human rights obligations.

Edmund Rice International stated that Peru had laws and regulations that prohibited the use of physical and humiliating punishment of children and adolescents.  However, the Peruvian Government had an inadequate capacity to carry out an effective enforcement of the law due to the lack of information and resources.  In many cases, domestic violence was culturally accepted because it was considered part of children’s upbringing.

International Commission of Jurists recognized the progress made in the field of human rights by Peru.  Nevertheless, the investigation of past crimes and the struggle against impunity had seen setbacks with the granting of the Presidential pardon to the former President Alberto Fujimori.  The organization called on the Government of Peru to implement relevant recommendations.

International Service for Human Rights, in a joint statement with National Coordinator for Human Rights), underlined that the recent Presidential pardon granted to the former President Alberto Fujimori had demonstrated that the impunity for the crimes committed during the civil war continued and that victims remained without redress.  The State had stepped up criminalization of social protest.  The Government should uphold the rule of law and implement a policy of protection for human rights defenders. 

Istituto Internazionale Maria Ausiliatrice delle Salesiane di Don Bosco, in a joint statement with Caritas Internationalis International Confederation of Catholic Charities and International Volunteerism Organization for Women, Education and Development – VIDES) commended Peru for increasing the budget for education by 15 per cent and reducing the rural education gap as well as establishing more medial programmes for children.  Still, indigenous children suffered from discrimination and those who had travelled to cities to study were bullied, particularly girls.  Peru was called on to allocate more funds for schooling of ingenious children and develop inclusive education for them.

Amnesty International was concerned about serious setbacks in Peru.  The President had granted a pardon to former President Alberto Fujimori who had been sentenced to 25 years for crimes against humanity.  Such an act had profound consequences for the right of truth. The recent decision by the National Criminal Court of Peru not to apply the presidential grace was welcomed.  Peru had failed to ensure that indigenous people who had been exposed to toxic metals had access to adequate health care.

Centro de Promocion y Defensa de los Derechos Sexuales y Reproductivos was pleased that the State had accepted recommendations concerning lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex rights.  However, the new human rights plan had not included prevention measures against domestic violence or violence against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex persons.  Access to abortion was still limited and the Congress opposed decriminalization of abortion.

National Coordinator for Human Rights said that for all those disappeared under the Fujimori Government, President Kuczynski’s pardon of such acts and the decision to extinguish all ongoing criminal proceedings against him was an insult to all the victims seeking justice.

The Vice-President of the Human Rights Council informed that out of 182 recommendations received, Peru had supported 177 and noted 5.

CLAUDIO JULIO DE LA PUENTE RIBEYRO, Permanent Representative of Peru to the United Nations Office at Geneva, thanked speakers for highlighting human rights issues where additional work and resources were needed.  Peru was respectful of its international commitments and of its internal judicial order and would continue to work on sexual and reproductive rights and rights of indigenous people.  There were several recommendations on those themes that were accepted by Peru.  Implementation of those recommendations would be the biggest challenge to improving the situation of those groups and the international community could count on Peru’s commitment to work to that end.

The Council then adopted the Universal Periodic Review outcome of Peru.


For use of the information media; not an official record

HRC18.047E