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ECOSOC HOLDS PANEL DISCUSSION TO MARK THE 10-YEAR FRAMEWORK OF PROGRAMMES ON SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT AND PRODUCTION
Holds General Discussion on the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries, Regional Cooperation, and the Repercussions of Israeli’s Occupation on Palestinians and Arabs Living in the Occupied Territories
19 July 2013

The Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) this morning held a panel discussion to mark the 10-year Framework of Programmes on Sustainable Development and Production and started a general discussion on the implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples; regional cooperation; and economic and social repercussions of the Israeli occupation on the living conditions of the Palestinian people in the occupied Palestinian territory, including East Jerusalem, and the Arab population in the occupied Syrian Golan. 

Martin Sajdik, Vice-President of the Economic and Social Council, said that at the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development Rio+20, Governments reaffirmed the critical importance of shifting towards sustainable consumption and production patterns.  Governments also formally adopted the 10-Year Framework of Programmes on Sustainable Consumption and Production Patterns, providing the global platform for international cooperation, and designated the Council as the interim reporting body of the 10-Year Framework of Programmes.

Arab Hoballah, Chief, Sustainable Consumption and Production Branch, United Nations Environment Programme, said that things were not improving with regard to climate change and eco system issues.  The 10-year Framework of Programmes was a global framework of action to enhance international cooperation and to accelerate the shift towards sustainable consumption and production in both developed and developing countries.  A 10-Member Board had been appointed with representatives from across the world.  The programmes at the core of the 10-year Framework of Programmes included consumer information, sustainable lifestyles and education and sustainable tourism programmes.         

Balthasar Kambuaya, Minister for the Environment of Indonesia, said that in line with the global agenda towards sustainable development, Indonesia had established the policy strategy of “pro-growth, pro-job, pro-poor and pro-environment” and had adopted a development agenda with a view to improving Indonesian people’s quality of life through changes in production and consumption behaviours into green and sustainable ones.  The 10-year Framework at the international level should focus on capacity building and sharing of sustainable consumption and production best practices and resources. 

Anik Kohli, Senior Policy Advisor, Federal Office for the Environment of Switzerland, said that Switzerland had been committed to the 10-Year Framework of Programmes on Sustainable Consumption and Production Patterns since the World Summit on Sustainable Development in Johannesburg in 2002.  Since then, the national Sustainable Development Strategy of Switzerland included a measure on sustainable public procurement so that public procurement took into account not only economic aspects but also social and environmental aspects.  

Ncumisa Notutela, Deputy Permanent Representative of South Africa to the United Nations in Geneva, said that South Africa supported the 10-Year Framework of Programmes on Sustainable Consumption and Production Patterns in the broader context of sustainable development.  It had started with the development of its own sustainable consumption and production framework as a roadmap for all stakeholders, the private sector and Government.  The collaboration between the Government and the private sector ensured that the needs of the population were taken care of through the provision of infrastructure. 

Marion Barthelemy, Chief, Intergovernmental and Interagency Support Branch, Division for Sustainable Development, United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, said that an interagency coordination group was established in May 2013 to support the implementation of the 10-year Framework. Its objectives were greater visibility of the framework as key to Rio+20 implementation, ensuring that the United Nations system made substantive contributions to support the implementation of the 10-year framework, and strengthening coordination among United Nations bodies to promote sustainable consumption and production patterns.

Charles Arden-Clarke, Acting Head, 10-Year Framework of Programmes Secretariat, United Nations Environment Programme, said that the objectives of the Global Sustainable Consumption and Production Clearinghouse included inspiring policy-makers, the business sector and civil society; collecting and disseminating information, knowledge and best practices; and building cooperation at all levels through a directory of experts and working groups.  Future developments included creating profiles and specific rights for national focal points and organizing webinars.

Participating in the interactive dialogue were Mexico, Russia, European Union, Egypt, Venezuela and Republic of Korea.

The Council also started its general discussion on the implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples by the specialized agencies and the institutions associated with the United Nations; the issue of regional cooperation; and the economic and social repercussions of the Israeli occupation on the living conditions of the Palestinian people in the occupied Palestinian territory, including East Jerusalem, and the Arab population in the occupied Syrian Golan.

Jose Eduardo Proano, Representative of Ecuador, said that he was presenting a recommendation on “Support for non-self-governing territories by specialized agencies and international institutions associated with the United Nations”.  Drawing the attention of the Council to the report by the President of the Special Committee of Decolonization and Ambassador of Ecuador, Mr. Proano said that the Special Committee had noted with satisfaction the integration of many non-self-governing territories in the work of the various bodies of the United Nations, and underlined that small island developing States should be at the heart of the post-2015 agenda.

Tarik Alami, Director of the Emerging and Conflict-Related Issues Division at the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia, introducing the note of the Secretary-General on the economic and social repercussions of the Israeli occupation on the living conditions of the Palestinian people in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and the Arab population in the occupied Syrian Golan, said that Israel had been implementing policies that discriminated against Palestinians in a manner equated to de facto segregation, including establishment of two separate legal systems and sets of institutions, one for Israeli settlers and another for Palestinians living under occupation.

In the general discussion, speakers said that the prolonged Israeli occupation violated international law and the Geneva Conventions and should not be allowed to continue with impunity.  Regional cooperation remained very important and the priorities and objectives of the Regional Cooperation Committee should support further coordination in areas such as economic integration, transport and forestry. 

The following delegations took the floor during the general discussion: Fiji on behalf of Group of 77 and China, Palestine, Russian Federation, Turkey, and Jordan.

The Economic and Social Council will resume its work this afternoon at 3 p.m., when it will resume its general discussion and then take action on draft resolutions.

Panel Discussion to Mark the 10-Year Framework of Programmes on Sustainable Consumption and Production

MARTIN SAJDIK, Vice-President of the Economic and Social Council, said that at the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development Rio+20, Governments reaffirmed the critical importance of shifting towards sustainable consumption and production patterns as an overarching objective of and prerequisite for sustainable development.  Governments also formally adopted the 10-Year Framework of Programmes on Sustainable Consumption and Production Patterns, providing the global platform for international cooperation to accelerate the shift towards sustainable consumption and production patterns in both developed and developing countries.  They designated the Economic and Social Council as the interim reporting body of the 10-Year Framework of Programmes on Sustainable Consumption and Production Patterns.  Today, they would get an insight into the main objectives, goals and activities of the 10-Year Framework of Programmes on Sustainable Consumption and Production Patterns during its first year.  They had a full complement of experts and high-level decision-makers to take them through some of the challenges and opportunities for delivering transformative change towards sustainable consumption and production patterns. 

SYLVIE LEMMET, Director, Division of Technology, Industry and Economics, United Nations Environment Programme, Moderator, introduced the panellists present today and gave the floor to Arab Hoballah, Chief of the Sustainable Consumption and Production Branch of the United Nations Environment Programme. 

ARAB HOBALLAH, Chief, Sustainable Consumption and Production Branch, United Nations Environment Programme, said that things were not improving with regard to climate change and ecosystem issues.  The two to three billion new consumers were expected to have a massive impact on production and consumption.  Since Rio 1992 it had become clear that sustainable consumption and production was one of the overarching objectives of, and essential requirements for, sustainable development.  The 10-year Framework of Programmes on Sustainable Consumption and Production was a global framework of action to enhance international cooperation and to accelerate the shift towards sustainable consumption and production in both developed and developing countries.  It would also support capacity building and facilitate access to financial and technical assistance for developing countries, and serve as an information and knowledge sharing platform to enable all stakeholders to exchange policies.  A 10-Member Board had been appointed, with members from South Africa, Tanzania, Bangladesh sharing a seat with Indonesia, Republic of Korea sharing a seat with Japan, Romania, Russia, Chile, Mexico, Switzerland, and Finland sharing a seat with Germany.  The programmes at the core of the 10-year Framework of Programmes included consumer information, sustainable lifestyles and education and sustainable tourism programmes.  These would serve as “umbrellas” which would bring together existing initiatives and develop new partnerships to fill capacity and knowledge gaps.  To date, over 105 countries had nominated their national focal points, but action was also being taken at the regional level.         

BALTHASAR KAMBUAYA, Minister for the Environment, Indonesia, said that in 2011 he had hosted the Tenth Conference of the Asia Pacific Roundtable on Sustainable Consumption and Production in Yogyarta, Indonesia.  The conference result recognized that being the world’s most populous region and enjoying the world’s highest economic growth rate, implementation of sustainable consumption and production to sustainable prosperity was fundamental for the Asia and Pacific region.  In line with the global agenda towards sustainable development, Indonesia had established the policy strategy of “pro-growth, pro-job, pro-poor and pro-environment”.  Indonesia supported the 10-year Framework of Programmes on Sustainable Consumption and Production as a set of systematic and coordinated efforts aiming to advance sustainable consumption and production towards sustainable development, both at the national and international level.  At the national level, Indonesia had adopted a development agenda with a view to improving Indonesian people’s quality of life through changes in production and consumption behaviours into green and sustainable ones.  Mr. Kambuaya encouraged the 10-year Framework of Programmes on Sustainable Consumption and Production at the international level to focus on capacity building and sharing of sustainable consumption and production best practices and resources, including the use of tangible measures and indicators.  While global action was needed at the implementation level, the sovereignty of nations should be respected.    

ANIK KOHLI, Senior Policy Advisor, Federal Office for the Environment of Switzerland, said that Switzerland had been committed to the 10-Year Framework of Programmes on Sustainable Consumption and Production Patterns since the World Summit on Sustainable Development in Johannesburg in 2002.  Public procurement represented between 15 and 25 per cent of GDP and offered a tremendous opportunity towards innovation and sustainable development.  Experience showed that sustainable public procurement had the potential to transform markets, boot the competitiveness of eco industries, save money, conserve natural resources and foster job creation.  Since 2002, the national Sustainable Development Strategy of Switzerland included a measure on sustainable public procurement, so that public procurement took into account not only economic aspects but also social and environmental aspects.  On sustainable food systems, food consumption and production trends and patterns were among the main causes of pressure on the environment.  Fundamental changes in the way food was produced, processed, transported and consumed were indispensable for achieving sustainable development.  On the national level, Switzerland launched in 2012 a collaboration of different Ministries to discuss the challenges of food waste among others, by generating the necessary data and setting up a dialogue with relevant stakeholders from the private sector and civil society.  

NCUMISA NOTUTELA, Deputy Permanent Representative of South Africa to the United Nations Office at Geneva, said that South Africa supported the Ten-Year Framework of Programmes on Sustainable Consumption and Production Patterns in the broader context of sustainable development.  It had started with the development of its own sustainable consumption and production framework as a roadmap for all stakeholders, the private sector and Government.  The collaboration between the Government and the private sector ensured that the needs of the population were taken care of through the provision of infrastructure.  On sustainable building and construction, the Government provided the guidelines for urban and rural development and the private sector implemented these policies.  The movement of people from rural areas to cities in search of work and wealth was a common phenomenon in developing countries and often came at the cost of a deteriorating environment.  The formation of the Green Building Council in 2007 in South Africa was leading the greening of the country’s industry and provided the tool, training and network to promote green building practices across the country.  The African continent had also developed its own Ten-Year Framework of Programmes on Sustainable Consumption and Production Patterns.  The emphasis when developing this Framework was on the importance of linking sustainable consumption and production with the challenge of meeting basic needs and the provision of sustainable livelihood.  The awareness of sustainable building and construction in the rest of Africa was also gaining ground.  On sustainable tourism, South Africa continued to pioneer responsible tourism. 

Mexico welcomed the initiative to organize this meeting.  Promoting sustainable consumption and production and sustainable development were both vital topics, since sustainable development would be the main focus of the post-2015 agenda.  It was essential to have an appropriate framework for sustainable consumption and production, and the 10-year Framework must have the appropriate policy and institutional basis drawing on existing structures.  Clear definitions and effective funding mechanisms were needed, taking into account the situation in every country.

Russia said that the adoption of the 10-Year Framework of Programmes on Sustainable Consumption and Production was one of the most tangible results of the Rio+20 Conference; it could function as a vital tool for the implementation of programmes on sustainable development.  A creative and flexible approach to the 10-year Programme was needed so as to take into account the regional and national priorities of countries with regard to sustainable development.     
 
European Union said that the 10-year Framework of Programmes on Sustainable Consumption and Production was important to all countries and sectors, especially concerning public procurement and tourism.  The framework could also provide good examples for international cooperation.  The European Union asked what role sustainable consumption and production could play in the formulation of the post-2015 agenda.   

Egypt enquired with regards to a trust fund for the 10 Ten-Year Framework of Programmes on Sustainable Consumption and Production Patterns, whether there was some sort of coordination between funds or were they doing their own things on their own?  Regarding of the five indicators mentioned by Mr. Hoballah, for the first one on consumer information, was there coordination with the International Standardization Organization and other similar organizations on work done on the 10-Year Framework?

Venezuela said that it was important to radically change production and consumption patterns and this had to be a world effort.  Changes had to take place as quickly as possible.  This was a huge challenge as there was a contradiction with the economic model that led to wealth and excessive economic growth.  They needed development based on social consideration.  The importance of education was underlined.  The debate on sustainable energy in the United Nations should be based on other considerations, non-geopolitical ones.

ARAB HOBALLAH, Chief of the Sustainable Consumption and Production Branch, Division of Technology, Industry and Economics, United Nations Environment Programme, said that when it came to the trust fund and the relation with other funds, there was no operational trust fund at present, but discussions were underway.  Work was indeed being done with International Standardization Organization such as on labelling and the building sector, and a common carbon matrix had been developed.  Work was also being done with similar organizations.

ANIK KOHLI, Senior Policy Advisor, Federal Office for the Environment of Switzerland, said that in terms of collaboration, food consumption was a big issue which was being tackled.  Concerning the question posed by the European Union, discussions were currently taking place to decide how best to implement sustainable consumption and production at the national level. 

NCUMISA NOTUTELA, Deputy Permanent Representative of South Africa to the United Nations Office at Geneva, said that South Africa was facing unemployment and inequality, so any approach to sustainable consumption and production patterns should take into account the development needs of the country and the problems facing those living in poverty. 

BALTHASAR KAMBUAYA, Minister of Environment of Indonesia, on the role of the Sustainable Development and Production Programme in the post-2015 agenda, referred to the report of the High-Level Panel of Eminent Persons on the Post-2015 Development Agenda, entitled ‘A New Global Partnership: Eradicate poverty and transform economies through sustainable development.’

Republic of Korea said that it would join the efforts of the Ten-Year Framework of Programmes on Sustainable Consumption and Production Patterns.  Five steps had been proposed by Mr. Hoballah.  Regarding step four, the Republic of Korea was curious and asked for more background on this step.

ARAB HOBALLAH, Chief of the Sustainable Consumption and Production Branch, Division of Technology, Industry and Economics, United Nations Environment Programme, said that the secretariat would ensure that for the components that had been approved in the main document in Rio and validated by the General Assembly where there was a set of criteria, each and every programme had to respond adequately to all these points.  The Board would then be consulted. 

MARION BARTHELEMY, Chief, Intergovernmental and Interagency Support Branch, Division for Sustainable Development, United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, said that an interagency coordination group was established in May 2013 to support the implementation of the 10-year Framework.  The objectives of the group were greater visibility of the framework as key to Rio+20 implementation, ensuring that the United Nations system made substantive contributions to support the implementation of the 10-year Framework, and strengthening coordination among United Nations bodies to promote sustainable consumption and production patterns.  The group might decide to undertake joint research and analytical work on priority areas related to sustainable consumption and production.  The feedback mechanism from the High-level Political Forum on Sustainable Development to the 10-year Framework of Programmes was a crucial element which they should support, because it would allow all to sustain the political momentum behind the movement on sustainable consumption and production.  The main message was that the United Nations system was committed to working together collaboratively to support the implementation of the 10-year Framework.     

CHARLES ARDEN-CLARKE, Acting Head, 10-Year Framework of Programmes
Secretariat, United Nations Environment Programme, said that the Global Sustainable Consumption and Production Clearinghouse had the following five objectives: to serve as the information hub for the 10-year Framework; inspire policy-makers, the business sector and civil society; collect and disseminate information, knowledge and best practices; build cooperation at all levels through a directory of experts and working groups; and share and learn from news and events.  Key future developments included creating profiles and specific rights for national focal points, mapping initiatives and networks, especially those contributing to programmes, and organizing webinars.  At the end of Mr. Arden-Clarke’s presentation, a video was shown on the activities of the Global Sustainable Consumption and Production Clearinghouse.  

SYLVIE LEMMET, Director, Division of Technology, Industry and Economics, United Nations Environment Programme, said that indeed there was tremendous interest in seeing how this 10-Year Framework of Programmes on Sustainable Consumption and Production Patterns was going to be implemented.  It was interesting to see how many countries had already started programmes in the different areas and to know that countries were stepping up their work to steer those programmes, for the Board to formally adopt them.  A lot had been heard about interesting cross-cutting issues and it would be important to develop a monitoring process. 

MARTIN SAJDIK, Vice-President of the Economic and Social Council, said that unfortunately they could not yet say that sustainable consumption and production was only one click away.  They would have to wait a little bit but they had a 10-Year Framework of Programmes on Sustainable Consumption and Production Patterns.

Documentation

The Council has before it the report of the United Nations Secretary-General on implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples by the specialized agencies and the international institutions associated with the United Nations (A/68/62).

The Council has before it the report of the United Nations Secretary-General on assistance to the Palestinian people (A/68/76–E/2013/65).

The Council has before it the report of the President of the Council on consultations with the Special Committee on the Situation with regard to the Implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples (E/2013/55).

The Council has before it a report on the economic situation in the Economic Commission for Europe region: Europe, North America and the Commonwealth of Independent States in 2012-2013 (E/2013/16).

The Council has before it an overview of economic and social conditions in Africa,
2012-2013 (E/2013/17).

The Council has before it a summary of the Economic and Social Survey of Asia and
the Pacific 2013 (E/2013/18).

The Council has before it a report on Latin America and the Caribbean: economic situation and outlook, 2012-2013 (E/2013/19).

The Council has before it a summary of the survey of economic and social developments in the Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia region, 2012-2013 (E/2013/20).

The Council has before it a note by the United Nations Secretary-General on a project for a Europe-Africa fixed link through the Strait of Gibraltar: report on activities carried out during the period 2006-2013 and programme proposed for the period 2013-2015 (E/2013/21).
 
The Council has before it a note by the United Nations Secretary-General on the economic and social repercussions of the Israeli occupation on the living conditions of the Palestinian people in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem,
and the Arab population in the occupied Syrian Golan (A/68/77–E/2013/13).

Presentation of Reports

JOSE EDUARDO PROANO, Representative of Ecuador, said that he was presenting a recommendation on “Support for non-self-governing territories by specialized agencies and international institutions associated with the United Nations”.  Drawing the attention of the Council to the report by the President of the Special Committee of Decolonization and Ambassador of Ecuador, Mr. Proano said that the Special Committee had noted with satisfaction the integration of many non-self-governing territories in the work of the various bodies of the United Nations.  Such territories needed assistance in order to find solutions to the particular problems which they faced, as recognized in successive resolutions adopted by the Council.  Development opportunities were especially limited for small island developing countries, and the Special Committee had decided to approach the matter from a comprehensive point of view.  The post-2015 development agenda was particularly important to those territories.  However, Mr. Proano also pointed out that several of those countries as non-United Nations Members had not been included in the category of “small island developing States”. 
 
MARTIN SAJDIK, Vice-President of the Economic and Social Council, recalled that under Item 10 on regional cooperation, the report of the Secretary-General on regional cooperation in the economic, social and related fields was introduced to the Council on July 5 at the opening of the Coordination Segment.  Subsequently, the Council adopted the four draft resolutions contained in the addenda to the report. 

TARIK ALAMI, Director of the Emerging and Conflict-Related Issues Division at the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia, introducing the note of the Secretary-General on the economic and social repercussions of the Israeli occupation on the living conditions of the Palestinian people in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and the Arab population in the occupied Syrian Golan, said that Israel had been implementing policies that discriminated against Palestinians in a manner equated to de facto segregation, including establishment of two separate legal systems and sets of institutions, one for Israeli settlers and another for Palestinians living under occupation.  Discrimination also extended to planning and construction.  Palestinians were forced to build without permits and consequently faced the threat of demolition of property.  Israel revoked residency status of more that 250,000 Palestinians between 1967 and 1994 from the West Bank and the Gaza strip and was still doing so in East Jerusalem.  Israel continued to use disproportionate use of force against Palestinians.  Israeli security apparatuses continued to deny thousands of Palestinian prisoners, including children, many of their rights and utilized practices that amounted to torture.  Israel’s systematic use of administrative detention amounted to a policy of arbitrary detention which prompted hunger strikes by Palestinian prisoners throughout 2012.  Forced displacement continued due to Israel’s practices and policies, including the policy of home demolitions.

The settlements and Israeli policies regarding them amounted to the illegal transfer of its population to an occupied territory and appeared to reaffirm Israel’s intention to maintain control over these territories.  The Government of Israel had announced the advancement of the E1 settlement plan, which would completely sever East Jerusalem from the rest of the West Bank, and the north and southern parts of the West Bank itself.  Unabated, settler violence and intimidation against Palestinians had been increasing with the aim of forcing Palestinians off their lands.  The International Court of Justice concluded that the wall and its associated regime were illegal and that Israel had to dismantle it and provide reparations.  Still, the 708 kilometre wall continued to be the single largest obstacle to movement for Palestinians.  Palestinians faced daily obstacles and humiliation during their daily movements.  Economic growth in the West Bank and Gaza strip continued to be unsustainable and restricted by the policies of the Israeli occupation.  More than 40 per cent of Palestinian households were classified as food insecure or vulnerable to food insecurity.  Alarmingly high rates of anaemia in Palestinian children and pregnant women were recorded.  Israel continued its de facto annexation policies in the Syrian Golan, as well as discrimination of the population.  This included restrictions on building permits, essential services and water allocation, especially for irrigation.  The note concluded that in addition to social and economic impact, the prolonged occupation violated United Nations resolutions and international law and should not be allowed to persist with impunity.  All efforts should be exerted by the international community to ensure the implementation of United Nations resolutions and international law.

General Discussion on the implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples by the specialized agencies and the international institutions associated with the United Nations; regional cooperation; and economic and social repercussions of the Israeli occupation on the living conditions of the Palestinian people in the occupied Palestinian territory, including East Jerusalem, and the Arab population in the occupied Syrian Golan

Fiji, speaking on behalf of Group of 77 and China, said that the prolonged Israeli occupation violated international law and the Geneva Conventions and should not be allowed to continue with impunity.  Economic growth in the occupied Palestinian territories continued to be severely restricted by Israeli policies and, as a result, remained unsustainable.  It was time for the international community to take action in order to end the sufferings of the Palestinian people and improve their living conditions, and to uphold the fundamental rights of all persons living in the occupied territories, including East Jerusalem and the Arab population in the occupied Syrian Golan.     

Palestine welcomed the report and urged for its recommendations to be implemented so that Palestinians could enjoy their fundamental and inalienable rights.  The international community was still unable to implement mechanisms to put an end to the sufferings of the Palestinian people and to implement the resolutions of the United Nations, including those of the Council.  Israel continued to violate international law with severe repercussions caused by its occupation affecting the Palestinian people. 

Russian Federation said that regional cooperation remained very important and the priorities and objectives of the Regional Cooperation Committee should support further coordination in areas such as economic integration, transport and forestry.  The Russian Federation was in favour of initiatives to harmonize rail law and to free transport space from barriers throughout the Eurasian continent.  It also expressed concern at the reduction in the budget of the Committee.     

Turkey noted with regret that people in the Occupied Palestinian Territories continued to live in difficult conditions due to measures applied by the Israeli Government.  Israel’s practices in Gaza were illegal and unsustainable.  Israel’s ever-expanding provocative settlement activities remained the major obstacles before the resumption of negotiations.  The international community should press upon Israel to put an end to its aggressive policies.

Jordan said that the information in the report gave rise to very strong concerns.  Israel as the occupying power was pursuing its policies of colonization against the Palestinian population.  Under relevant United Nations resolutions and international law, the peace process had to follow the two-State solution.  Israel’s policies had repercussions, affecting the Palestinian population socially and economically.  The international community should bring Israel to face its international responsibilities.

MARTIN SAJDIK, Vice-President of the Economic and Social Council, said that the general debate would continue in the afternoon and the Council would then take action on draft proposals.


For use of the information media; not an official record

ECOSOC13/029E


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