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ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL COUNCIL ADOPTS RESOLUTION ON GENDER MAINSTREAMING IN THE UNITED NATIONS SYSTEM
Holds Panel on Making the UN System Accountable for Gender Equality and a Discussion on Women and Development and the Advancement of Women
24 July 2013

The Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) this morning adopted a resolution on mainstreaming a gender perspective into all policies and programmes in the United Nations system.  The Council also held a panel discussion on making the United Nations system accountable for gender equality and women’s empowerment: progress, gaps and challenges; and a general discussion on women and development and the advancement of women.

The resolution (E/2013/L.14), requested the Secretary-General to submit to the Council at its substantive session in 2014 a report on the implementation of the resolution, including the promotion of accountability at both national and global levels and progress made in the implementation of the System-wide Action Plan. 

Martin Sajdik, Vice-President of the Economic and Social Council, in introductory remarks, said the United Nations System-wide Action Plan on Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women was a landmark action plan that created the first set of common measures for the United Nations system to evaluate progress in its gender-related work.  Today, a distinguished panel would share with the Council the experience of their organizations in the implementation of the Action Plan.   

Nicole Ameline, Chairperson of the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women, said one could not talk about sustainable development without also talking about women’s rights.  The Committee’s role was to support States to found real policies that ended discrimination against women and ensured women’s full participation in progress and growth.  The economic emancipation of women was vital in eradicating violence against women.  The direct link between human rights and development was part of the vision of States – it was also the vision of humanity. 

Lakshmi Puri, Acting Head of the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women), introducing the report of the Secretary-General on Mainstreaming a Gender Perspective into all Policies and Programmes in the United Nations System, said the report included data from 55 United Nations entities reporting for the first time on progress made under the United Nations System-wide Action Plan on Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment. 

In her introductory remarks as moderator of the panel discussion, Ms. Puri spoke about how since the foundation of UN Women in 2010, standards of gender mainstreaming within the United Nations system had increased at the global, regional and national levels. 

Flavia Pansieri, Deputy High Commissioner for Human Rights, recalled that it was almost 20 years since the famous “human rights are women’s rights and women’s rights are human rights” speech at the United Nations World Conference on Women in Beijing.  The Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights was very proud to have total gender parity at senior leadership levels, D2 and above.  It was important to continue to mobilize resources as gender equality was not an option, it was vital for the continued success of all aspects of the work of the United Nations. 

Amanda Khozi Mukwashi, Chief, Volunteer Knowledge and Innovation, United Nations Volunteers, spoke about how their leadership was committed in addressing issues of gender equality and recognised the significant link between gender and volunteerism. 
Learning strategies for volunteers and staff were being developed to equip them with the necessary required tools, skills and knowledge to champion gender mainstreaming. 

Raphael Crowe, Senior Gender Specialist, Bureau for Gender Equality, International Labour Organization, spoke about how the International Labour Organization had a head start in meeting the requirements of the System-wide Action Plan as its first gender equality policy was launched in 1999 and in 2013 UN Women assessed that ILO exceeded or met requirements for 13 performance indicators.  Challenges remained in capacity development and resource allocation. 

During the panel discussion speakers raised the challenges of changing cultural thinking and stereotypes, and welcomed the progress the United Nations was making on gender mainstreaming.  Speakers asked why some United Nations entities had not yet included a gender dimension into their work, and about technical assistance from the United Nations.  Gender equality could not be enforced, it had to be lived, a speaker said, with the strongest determinant for success being strong leadership from top down. 

States asking questions during the panel discussion were New Zealand, France, United Kingdom and Iraq. 

The Council also held a general discussion on women and development and the advancement of women.   

During the general discussion, a speaker emphasized that 13 years after the world agreed on the Millennium Declaration, the majority of those living in poverty were still female.  The link between discrimination and violence against women and the obligation of States to end impunity for gender-related killings were raised, as was the need to promote women’s political participation and economic empowerment.  Other speakers highlighted religious sensibilities, accountability within the United Nations system and the scope of the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women.

Speaking in the general discussion were Lithuania, speaking on behalf of the European Union, Latvia, Japan, United States, Honduras, Bulgaria, Venezuela, Russia, South Africa, Austria, Libya and Sudan.  The Inter-Parliamentary Union and WOOMB International also took the floor.

The Council will resume its work at 3 p.m. this afternoon to hold a general discussion on a number of issues under its agenda item on economic and environmental questions, before it takes action on a number of draft resolutions and administrative decisions.   

Documentation

The Council has before it a report of the United Nations Secretary-General on mainstreaming a gender perspective into all policies and programmes in the United Nations system (E/2013/71), which places particular emphasis on accountability for system-wide work on gender equality and the empowerment of women at both the global and the country level, including the roll-out of the United Nations System-wide Action Plan on Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women.

The Council has before it the report of the Commission on the Status of Women on the fifty-seventh session (4-15 March 2013) (E/2013/27)

The Council has before it a note by the Secretariat on the results of the fifty-first, fifty-second and fifty-third sessions of the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (E/2013/75)
Opening Statements on Mainstreaming a Gender Perspective, Women and Development, and the Advancement of Women

MARTIN SAJDIK, Vice-President of the Economic and Social Council, said that with 187 States parties, the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) was the second most widely ratified human rights treaty and provided an international legal framework to promote gender equality and women’s empowerment.  Following the adoption of the World Plan of Action at the World Conference of the International Women’s Year in Mexico City in 1975, the drafting of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination took place in the Commission on the Status of Women, one of the subsidiary bodies of the Economic and Social Council, during 1976, followed by extensive deliberations from 1977 to 1979 through a working group of the Third Committee of the General Assembly.  The Convention had been finally adopted by the General Assembly in 1979, and entered into force in September 1981, faster than any previous human rights convention.  Mr. Sajdik commended the Committee’s commitment to upholding women’s human rights around the world and its tireless efforts to monitor and support the implementation of the Convention.

NICOLE AMELINE, Chairperson of the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women, said women were not only the principal victims of violence but also the group at the forefront of sustainable development.  One could not talk about sustainable development without also talking about women’s rights.  The current session of the Committee had been marked by substantial problems, such as the situation of women in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and in Afghanistan.  The Committee’s role was to support States to found real policies that ended discrimination against women and ensured women’s full participation in progress and growth.  That needed ambitious planning, funding, organization, cross-cutting measures and a holistic approach.  What was the point of schools if girls were beaten up on the way to the classroom?  What was the point of a micro credit scheme for rural women if inheritance laws deprived them of the right to own land?  What was the point of women participating in politics if stereotypes prevented them from being elected?  Economic and social rights had a central place in the Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women because the economic emancipation of women was vital in eradicating violence against women.  The United Nations Secretary-General had said the role of women in development was a vital pre-condition for success.  The direct link between human rights and development was part of the vision of States – it was also the vision of humanity. 

MARTIN SAJDIK, Vice-President of the Economic and Social Council, said with this landmark action plan the United Nations had created a set of common measures to evaluate progress in its gender-related work for the first time.  The expectations were high – the effective implementation of the United Nations System-wide Action Plan on Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women should enhance accountability and measure progress towards the achievement of gender equality and the empowerment of women.  Today a distinguished panel would share with the Council the experience of their organizations in the implementation of the Action Plan.   

LAKSHMI PURI, Acting Head of the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women), introducing the report of the Secretary-General (E/2013/71), recalled that 16 years ago, the Council had adopted its first resolution on gender mainstreaming to guide the United Nations in delivering on global commitments on gender equality and the empowerment of women.  With the establishment of UN Women in July 2010 and with a strong new mandate from the United Nations General Assembly the system had been challenged to better support Member States in strengthening and implementing their normative frameworks and international commitments on gender equality and the empowerment of women.  As global discussions took place on the post-2015 development agenda, there was widespread recognition that greater efforts were needed to tackle continuing inequality and exclusion that held back freedom and development.  Women’s full and equal participation was essential to the achievement of sustainable development, poverty eradication, human rights and peace and security. 

The report of the Secretary-General included data from 55 United Nations entities reporting for the first time on progress made under the United Nations System-wide Action Plan on Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment, which had resulted in several significant and immediate shifts in how work related to gender equality and women’s empowerment was approached.  Standards had been established for mainstreaming gender perspectives into the work of the United Nations.  The report also provided the first baseline for the United Nations system performance on gender mainstreaming to measure progress achieving standards by 2017.  The main areas of support by United Nations country teams to advance national gender equality priorities in 2012 included ending violence against women, strengthening reproductive health, combating HIV/AIDS, supporting women’s political participation, advancing education, and incorporating gender equality into national development and poverty reduction strategies.  To build on this momentum, UN Women would continue to provide strong technical assistance.  It would be necessary to strengthen efforts to implement the System-wide Strategy on Gender Mainstreaming with an emphasis on effective coordination, enhanced resource mobilization and funding.  Stronger support should be provided to the incorporation of gender perspectives into the United Nations' development work at the country level and the post-2015 agenda offered a unique opportunity.

Panel on Making the United Nations System Accountable for Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment: Progress, Gaps and Challenges

LAKSHMI PURI, Acting Head of the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women), and Moderator of the Panel, said since the foundation of UN Women in 2010, standards of gender mainstreaming within the United Nations system had increased at the global, regional and national levels.  A harmonized reporting system had been developed.  Work on gender equality had been decentralized and mainstreamed across the United Nations system, with high-level commitment.  Gender focal points had been appointed in every entity and duty station.  It was a success story of United Nations inter-agency collaboration, so much so that the United Nations System-Wide Action Plan on Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women had spawned several copies, such as the Action Plan on Youth.  The report before ECOSOC today included data from 55 United Nations entities, and it was clear that while some entities were making progress, the majority needed to make significant efforts in order to meet 2017 targets.  Consistent monitoring and support were needed, while at a time of fiscal restraint, investment was important to protect gender empowerment and women’s initiatives.  Momentum must be maintained through collective activity and widespread engagement.

FLAVIA PANSIERI, Deputy High Commissioner for Human Rights, recalled that it was almost 20 years since the famous “human rights are women’s rights and women’s rights are human rights” speech at the United Nations World Conference on Women in Beijing.  Alongside the United Nations System-wide Action Plan on Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women, the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights in 2011 had adopted gender equality tools that helped ensure that gender was a dimension in the recruitment and performance of staff, and in helping staff meet gender equality targets both at headquarters and in the field.  Challenges included the difficulty of matching commitments to gender equality with resources available and the absence of a tracking system.  The Office of the High Commissioner of Human Rights was very proud to have total gender parity at senior leadership levels, D2 and above.  There were slightly more women than men at the junior level.  There was still a challenge in the retention of women in middle management who found it difficult to combine their reproductive role with their commitments as United Nations staff, especially when that required postings to field locations that were not family or child-friendly posts.  It was important to continue to mobilize resources as gender equality was not an option, it was vital for the continued success of all aspects of the work of the United Nations. 

LAKSHMI PURI, Assistant Secretary-General and Acting Executive Director of United Nations Women, and Moderator of the Panel, said that Ms. Pansieri’s presentation had stressed the added value of the United Nations System-wide Action Plan and its role as a source of introspection and external accountability, as well as the synergies within the United Nations system.  Resource mobilisation would constitute a common threat during the discussion.

AMANDA KHOZI MUKWASHI, Chief, Volunteer Knowledge and Innovation, United Nations Volunteers, said that United Nations Volunteers was a unique organization within the system as its contribution required that it worked with volunteers in partnership with and through other United Nations agencies.  United Nations Volunteer’s leadership had over the last several years been very committed and supportive in addressing issues of gender equality and recognising the significant link between gender and volunteerism.  The beginning of this year had seen United Nations Volunteers developing a strategic framework that would direct its focus and work over the next four years and senior management endorsed United Nations Volunteers participation in the United Nations System-wide Action Plan on Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women.  This served as a springboard and catalyst for both staff and management to engage in dialogue and conversation on gender equality and different aspects of the work of the Organization.

United Nations Volunteers would follow a two-pronged approach that enabled it to develop its staff capacity to engage effectively with gender mainstreaming actions, given that its volunteers undertook assignments in a wide range of sectors and professions, contributing to peace and development in 127 countries.  This provided a huge opportunity for United Nations Volunteers and the United Nations system to invest in this resource of individuals working in the field at different levels of decision making and engagement.  Learning strategies for volunteers and staff were being developed to equip them with the necessary required tools, skills and knowledge to champion gender mainstreaming.  The United Nations System-wide Action Plan called for each agency to attain or exceed a standard in several dimensions and United Nations Volunteers expected to attain such standards progressively, incrementally, and in a phased approach, including on engendering the strategic framework and the results based management.  United Nations Volunteers recognised the lack of a gender policy and there was a need to go beyond an engendered strategic plan. 

RAPHAEL CROWE, Senior Gender Specialist, Bureau for Gender Equality, International Labour Organization (ILO), said ILO was very active on inter-agency platforms on issues of women and gender equality, by conducting Gender Audits and hosting two workshops in Geneva on the United Nations System-wide Action Plan on Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women.  ILO had a head start in meeting the requirements of the System-wide Action Plan as it had had a gender equality policy since 1999, with a target of having 50 per cent of professional posts staffed by women.  In 2000 the International Labour Organization Action Plan for Gender Equality was launched, concentrating on three areas: staffing, substance (strategic planning and structure), gender architecture and information management.  In 2013 United Nations Women assessed that ILO exceeded or met requirements for 13 performance indicators.  Challenges remained in capacity development and resource allocation.  ILO needed support, including financial resources, on-going commitment from the Secretariat and backing by Member States. 

New Zealand recalled that comments in relation to human rights had highlighted the importance of culture change and asked the panellists for their reflections on how to implement this in practice.

France welcomed the holding of the roundtable and the fact that the United Nations was making progress on the matter of gender mainstreaming.  There were 55 United Nations entities working on this matter and it was important that the heart of the issue, which was normative, was not overlooked and transformed into a bureaucratic exercise.  How could the relationship among CEDAW, UNHCR and UN Women be strengthened?

United Kingdom said that, from the interventions by organizations participating in the panel, it seemed that some work had already been made, including gender thinking in their strategic plans; what was the real challenge for those organizations which had yet to start including a gender dimension into their work?

Iraq said that in the past there had been a total rejection of any gender perspective in Iraq but today it was starting to infiltrate State institutions, thanks to the United Nations agencies working in the country.  In the past three years Iraq had succeeded in taking qualitative steps in mainstreaming gender, as seen in the latest development plans.  The Ministry of State for Women’s Affairs had, with assistance from UN Women, launched a strategic plan for five ministries to fully implement the principle of gender equality.  Iraq needed assistance to create a programme to monitor successes achieved. 

LAKSHMI PURI, Acting Head of the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women), and Moderator of the Panel, said what was changing was the meaning of gender mainstreaming: it was no longer just about mainstreaming but instead it was the prioritizing of gender mainstreaming, giving it visibility and integrating it into every aspect of programme and policy.  The issue of reproductive health was crucial; women’s reproductive role in one way made them vulnerable, it was pertinent through the lens of violence against women or economic empowerment of women.  In reply to Iraq, Ms. Puri said she was very pleased and proud to hear they felt the United Nations system had helped both the government and civil society mobilize to achieve gender mainstreaming. 

NICOLE AMELINE, Chairperson of the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women, said that the Committee had proposed to UN Women to institutionalise their cooperation and they were working in an excellent spirit.  The conclusions and recommendations set up by the Committee served as a roadmap and this should be better integrated in the field by a broad range of stakeholders.  Ms. Ameline said the Committee would like to develop new tools and recalled Iraq’s comments regarding an intersectoral approach, which was not always easy; operational support should be provided.

AMANDA KHOZI MUKWASHI, Chief, Volunteer Knowledge and Innovation Section, United Nations Volunteers, responding to the questions posed by New Zealand and the United Kingdom, said that in terms of cultural challenges to gender mainstreaming, a lot had been said about gender mainstreaming.  At some level it was already in people’s minds but the shift from box-ticking to hearts and minds was still a challenge. 

RAPHAEL CROWE, Senior Gender Specialist, Bureau for Gender Equality, International Labour Organization (ILO), said they had found that technical people within ILO needed to be shown that gender mainstreaming made a positive difference in their work at grass roots, or country level.  The in-house Gender Audit process made a big difference to that end – cultural issues, such as working hours, or holding meetings at 5 p.m. on a Friday – came out during it.  If they mainstreamed gender it became second nature.  Leadership and a results-based management approach were very important. 

FLAVIA PANSIERI, Deputy High Commissioner for Human Rights, said it was difficult to change culture.  Gender equality could not be enforced, it had to be lived.  The strongest determinant was strong leadership from the top, the message that ‘this is important’ would eventually trickle down.  A second determinant was accountability: leadership had to make colleagues and staff accountable, as seen by the High Commissioner.   Thirdly, staff development: gender awareness and commitment must be checked at the time of recruitment and during performance evaluations.  Twenty years ago gender could be mainstreamed then forgotten, but today people had to follow­-up, measure successes and check indicators to ensure the changes wanted were brought about.  

LAKSHMI PURI, Acting Head of the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women), and Moderator of the Panel, in concluding remarks and responding to the question concerning the interaction between different United Nations bodies, highlighted the importance of supporting partners and the preparation of reports for the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women and shadow reports in support of civil society.  UN Women was also involved in so-called judicial activism, providing support and disseminating elements coming out of the work of the Committee.  There were synergies and mutually reinforcing work. 

General Discussion

Lithuania, speaking on behalf of the European Union, said that as the Economic and Social Council turned to the discussion on the advancement of women and reviewed the report on the fifty-seventh session of the Commission on the Status of Women, the European Union strongly welcomed the introduction of the agreed conclusions highlighting the linkage between discrimination and violence against women.  Violence against women was a clear violation of the human rights of women; custom, tradition, culture and religion could not be invoked to justify violence, or to avoid the obligations of States with respect to its prevention and elimination, and the effective prosecution of perpetrators. 
Latvia said that 13 years after the world agreed on the Millennium Declaration, the majority of those living in poverty were still female.  As a member of the UN Women Executive Board and its President for 2013, Latvia was committed to promoting women’s empowerment globally and believed that women’s political participation and economic empowerment were essential to shape respectful and equal relationships in society.  Key areas were professional education as an important foundation to women’s economic empowerment, as well as women’s representation in senior government and business positions. 

Japan said it was committed to the protection of women’s rights, and supported the Secretary General’s ‘Say No – UNite to End Violence against Women’ initiative, and was producing a National Action Plan on Women, Peace and Security.  The empowerment of women would significantly contribute to the revival of Japan’s economy and society at both national and local levels.  Finally, Japan welcomed the adoption of the Agreed Conclusion on the extremely important theme of the elimination of all forms of violence against women and girls at the Commission on the Status of Women this year. 
 
United States said that while intimate partner violence was endemic throughout the world and violence against women and girls based on their sexual orientation and gender identity was also prevalent, both were under-discussed and under-reported.  The Commission on the Status of Women’s agreed conclusions on preventing and eliminating violence against women were an important step toward elevating these issues, in an effort to ultimately end all forms of violence directed at women and girls.

Honduras welcomed progress made through the United Nations System-wide Action Plan under the leadership of UN Women, noting that accountability had been increased in the United Nations system.  Honduras was aware of the fact that more fair participation of women in society gave rise to democracy and social progress.  Gender equality had become a guiding principle for its Government.  Major challenges remained concerning issues such as domestic violence, violence against women and girls and the financial independence of women; States should not lose sights of their commitments in this regard.   

Bulgaria noted with satisfaction that on 12 July 2012 the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women assessed the periodic report of Bulgaria and said it appreciated the Committee’s in-depth consideration, identification of areas of concern and recommendations.  However, Bulgaria urged the Committee to avoid expanding the dialogue to topics outside the scope of the Convention, in particular to issues pertaining to other aspects of the legislation, policy and activities of States parties. 

Venezuela said to achieve a system that recognized the human rights of women and promoted their active participation in national life, Venezuela had ensured that women living in poverty were guaranteed access to education, training and public services, as seen through the National Women’s Development Bank.  Gender equality was ensured in decision-making processes, while the Government sought to strengthen women’s organizations.  Venezuela had made considerable progress in achieving an egalitarian and socialist society that had gender equality. 

Russia recalled the universality of the mandate of UN Women, applying to both developed and developing countries, and reiterated the conviction that economic equality was an important part of gender equality; Russia shared the approach taken by the International Labour Organization in this regard.  Women should have access to opportunities to set up their own enterprises.  Russia had joined the United Nations’ campaign to eradicate violence against women on the basis of the recommendations of the United Nations Secretary-General.   

South Africa said that this discussion was timely and important.  South Africa was particularly concerned that as the work started to change its focus and moved towards 2015 and beyond, the attainment of the Millennium Development Goals remained elusive and lagging; South Africa called on the international community to redouble efforts to achieve the Millennium Development Goals.  The challenges of violence, abuse and assault were pervasive in all parts of the world and the United Nations had to continue to be the centre of gravity for collective action to eradicate the scourge of violence against women and girls. 

Austria said gender-related killings were the most extreme manifestation of violence against women that occurred in large numbers in all parts of the world.  States must not turn a blind eye on those massive human rights violations, and must urgently step up efforts to prevent them and end impunity for such crimes.  The crucial role of the United Nations, and in particular the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, in that regard needed to be underlined.  Austria was a co-sponsor of the resolution on gender-related killings adopted at the twenty-second session of the Commission on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice.

Libya said it attached huge importance to the issue of the elimination of all forms of violence against women and girls.  Member States had different cultural and religious views.  Libya believed Islam guaranteed all human rights for women.  Islam believed that women were the nucleus of a sound family, and that was why God bequeathed women the opportunity to give birth to and raise children.  Libya was in the process of transferring from a revolution to a democratic system and was taking steps to ensure women’s participation in economic, social and political life, including in decision-making positions.

Sudan appreciated the efforts made by the United Nations and reiterated its position concerning respect for social and cultural traditions in dealing with the situation of women.  In Sudan women and girls constituted a large percentage of students at university and secondary education and records showed that Sudan was not lagging behind developed countries.  Women in Sudan occupied 36 per cent of the seats in Parliament and were represented at the national and governorate levels in senior positions.  Regarding respect for religions and belief when highlighting the role of women, Sudan highlighted the importance Islam conceded to women. 

Inter-Parliamentary Union, said that violence against women was a global problem that spared no country and was the result of entrenched gender inequality and gender-based discrimination.  The Union’s programme to combat violence against women built on the capacity of male and female members of parliaments and provided them with support to develop and enforce legislation on all forms of violence.  Violence against women in the political arena hindered women’s participation in politics and as a result, democracy, and could be used as a weapon in crisis situations, during elections, and when women were elected to office.

WOOMB International said that it worked through the Billings ovulation method which contributed to the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals.  The method allowed couples to avoid pregnancies and to make family planning choices effectively, it was also a form of knowledge that was passed on to future generations and provided knowledge about their worth and uniqueness.  Women were also empowered about knowledge about their fertility and reproductive system and, because the status of women was strengthened in their partners’ eyes, the Billings method also contributed to gender equality. 

Action on Resolution on Mainstreaming a Gender Perspective into all Policies and Programmes in the United Nations System

In a resolution on mainstreaming a gender perspective into all policies and programmes in the United Nations system (E/2013/L.14), the Council requests the United Nations system, including its agencies, funds and programmes, within their respective mandates, to accelerate mainstreaming the issue of gender in accordance with previous Council resolutions, in particular resolution 2008/34, General Assembly resolution 64/289 and General Assembly resolution 67/226, ensuring that managers provide leadership and support, within the United Nations system, to advance gender mainstreaming, strengthening reporting, monitoring and evaluation so as to allow system-wide assessment of progress in gender mainstreaming, and using existing training resources, including institutions and infrastructure, to assist in the development and application of unified training modules and tools on gender mainstreaming; also requests the United Nations system to continue and increase support to Member States, with their agreement and consent, in the implementation of national policies for the achievement of gender equality and the empowerment of women; requests the United Nations system, including its agencies, funds and programmes, within their respective organizational mandates, to continue working collaboratively to enhance and accelerate gender mainstreaming within the United Nations system; and requests the Secretary-General to submit to the Council at its substantive session of 2014 a report on the implementation of the present resolution, including the promotion of accountability at both national and global levels and progress made in the implementation of the System-wide Action Plan.

The resolution was adopted by the Council.


For use of the information media; not an official record

ECOSOC13/035E


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